These arguments are countered in two ways. First, the history of borrowers turning to illegal or dangerous sources of credit seems to have little basis in fact according to Robert Mayer's 2012 "Loan Sharks, Interest-Rate Caps, and Deregulation".[41] Outside of specific contexts, interest rates caps had the effect of allowing small loans in most areas without an increase of "loan sharking". Next, since 80% of payday borrowers will roll their loan over at least one time [11] because their income prevents them from paying the principal within the repayment period, they often report turning to friends or family members to help repay the loan [42] according to a 2012 report from the Center for Financial Services Innovation. In addition, there appears to be no evidence of unmet demand for small dollar credit in states which prohibit or strictly limit payday lending.
Unlike most loans, which require a minimum credit score for acceptance, payday loans don’t have any credit requirements. To apply, you need to present proof of income and a checking account, but the lender doesn’t look at your FICO score. Likewise, records of timely payments don’t appear on your credit report. So, a payday loan can’t help you build credit, and applying for one doesn’t impact it, either.
You can see how rolling over loans can lead to you paying much more than you initially borrowed. If you’re considering a payday loan but are worried about being able to pay it back, look into an installment loan. These tend to have smaller payments spread out over a longer time period. You can also work on improving your credit to become eligible for personal loans or credit cards, which have lower rates and monthly minimum payments.
MoneyLend.net does the hard work of researching lenders for consumers to provide them with the most accurate information they need to compare interest rates, types of lenders, fees and more. MoneyLend is able to match consumers to the best lender for them in all 50 states. Their lenders offer short-term and installment loans, and many have low APRs. They have information for those needing personal or business loans.
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