California Residents: Flurish Inc. dba LendUp is licensed by the Department of Business Oversight, pursuant to the California Deferred Deposit Transaction Law, license #1004393, and the California Financing Law, license #6054610. LendUp loans made under the authority of its CFL license are made pursuant to the California Financing Law. LendUp credit cards are not offered under any license regulated by the California Department of Business Oversight.
According to the CFB, more than 80 percent of payday loans are rolled over. When you roll over a loan, you pay the finance charge and have another two weeks to pay back the initial amount. For example, if you take out $200 with a $40 charge, you’d normally pay $240 at the end of a two-week period. If you can’t pay it all back, you pay the $40 and rollover the $200 while also taking on another $40 finance charge. If you pay that loan back, you end up paying a total of $280.
Payday loans are unsecured personal loans targeted at people who need money fast but don’t possess the type of credit or collateral required for a more traditional loan. Usually the only requirements to qualify for a payday loan are an active bank account and a job. Companies like MaxLend, RISE Credit, and CashMax have made an art out of providing high-interest loans to people who feel desperate and out of options.
Instead of getting a payday loan, you can apply for a line of credit, a service Speedy Cash offers in select states. A line of credit differs from a payday or installment loan in that you only pay interest on the amount you use, not the total you’re eligible to borrow. Like payday loans, the fees you pay on a line of credit vary from state to state – depending on the regulations in your state, you can end up paying as little as $13 or as much as $22 for every $100 you borrow. An advantage of a line of credit is you only draw the money you need and only pay back what you borrow, which gives you some flexibility. 

Debt settlement programs are generally set up by for-profit organizations, which negotiate with creditors on your behalf to pay a “settlement.” This settlement consists of a lump sum of money that is less than the full amount owed. Debt settlement programs require you dedicate a certain amount of money each month to paying into the settlement, until the full amount is reached.
DISCLOSURE: This is a solicitation for a title loan or payday loan. This is not a guaranteed offer and requires a complete and approved application. Title loans amount subject to vehicle evaluation. Results and actual loan amounts may vary. Certain limitations apply. All loans subject to customer's ability to repay. This site is affiliated with one or more of the licensed lenders referenced herein.
Though regulated at the state and federal level, there are still payday lenders that attempt to skirt the rules. Some are online-only lenders based in other countries. Other lenders work around state laws by operating out of Native American reservations. Be wary of brokers that offer to connect you with lending partners – this can result in a lot of calls and emails about offers.
Every state regulates payday loans differently. In some states, including Georgia, they are banned outright. In other states, interest rates are capped to such an extent that they are essentially banned. In total, 18 states ban payday loans. Other states, such as Oregon, have some restrictions in place, but payday lenders still operate in them. Payday loans come with few restrictions in 32 states. Any restrictions in these states tend to focus on the maximum number of loans someone can take out and not on rates.
Ashley Dull is the editor-in-chief of BadCredit.org, where she oversees a team of finance experts and journalists who develop in-depth industry profiles and advice articles read by more than 15 million Americans. Her years of experience reporting on consumer credit scores and reports positions Ashley to make smart recommendations on ways to improve one’s credit and avoid predatory lending. She is often asked to serve as an expert source on financial topics for national media outlets, including CNN Money, MarketWatch, Money Matters, ABC News, and NBC News, and is a regular contributor to several leading finance websites. Connect with Ashley on Twitter and LinkedIn.
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