Ashley Dull is the editor-in-chief of BadCredit.org, where she oversees a team of finance experts and journalists who develop in-depth industry profiles and advice articles read by more than 15 million Americans. Her years of experience reporting on consumer credit scores and reports positions Ashley to make smart recommendations on ways to improve one’s credit and avoid predatory lending. She is often asked to serve as an expert source on financial topics for national media outlets, including CNN Money, MarketWatch, Money Matters, ABC News, and NBC News, and is a regular contributor to several leading finance websites. Connect with Ashley on Twitter and LinkedIn.
According to a study by The Pew Charitable Trusts, "Most payday loan borrowers [in the United States] are white, female, and are 25 to 44 years old. However, after controlling for other characteristics, there are five groups that have higher odds of having used a payday loan: those without a four-year college degree; home renters; African Americans; those earning below $40,000 annually; and those who are separated or divorced." Most borrowers use payday loans to cover ordinary living expenses over the course of months, not unexpected emergencies over the course of weeks. The average borrower is indebted about five months of the year.[14] 

Payday loans, sometimes referred to as cash advance loans, have received quite a bit of bad press, but when used properly, a pay day loan can have a definite upside. A short term financial bind can happen to a lot of people and being able to get a small loan quickly can save you money by avoiding costly late fees or overdraft charges. Sure, $50 is a steep price to pay for a $300 payday loan, but if it means you are able to get your rent check, house payment, or car payment in on time and avoid the hefty late fees and possible damage to your credit score, it is more than worth it.
Often, you see APRs listed for payday loans as high as 600%. Because you pay the loan back in two weeks to a month, the APR serves mostly as a gauge of how expensive the loan is. Payday loans charge a finance fee, which ranges from $10 to $30 for each $100 you borrow. We chose to include this fee rather than APRs to give you a better idea of how much you’ll end up paying if you decide to get a payday loan.
California Residents: Flurish Inc. dba LendUp is licensed by the Department of Business Oversight, pursuant to the California Deferred Deposit Transaction Law, license #1004393, and the California Financing Law, license #6054610. LendUp loans made under the authority of its CFL license are made pursuant to the California Financing Law. LendUp credit cards are not offered under any license regulated by the California Department of Business Oversight.
A report from the Federal Reserve Bank of New York concluded that, "We ... test whether payday lending fits our definition of predatory. We find that in states with higher payday loan limits, less educated households and households with uncertain income are less likely to be denied credit, but are not more likely to miss a debt payment. Absent higher delinquency, the extra credit from payday lenders does not fit our definition of predatory."[24] The caveat to this is that with a term of under 30 days there are no payments, and the lender is more than willing to roll the loan over at the end of the period upon payment of another fee. The report goes on to note that payday loans are extremely expensive, and borrowers who take a payday loan are at a disadvantage in comparison to the lender, a reversal of the normal consumer lending information asymmetry, where the lender must underwrite the loan to assess creditworthiness. 
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