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Keep in mind that even the best payday lender is still extremely expensive, and you should try to find other options before visiting one. Fees vary depending on state regulations. In some states, such as Oregon, you pay around $13 for every $100 you borrow. In other states, such as Texas and Wisconsin, Check Into Cash charges $25 for every $100 you borrow. This puts the lender at about the industry average for payday loan fees. It doesn’t appear to take advantage of states with less stringent payday lending laws like Utah. We didn’t see fees greater than $25, which, while expensive, isn’t the highest we saw in our research.

Customer Notice: Payday Loans are typically for two-to four-week terms (up to six months in IL). Some borrowers, however, use Payday Loans for several months, which can be expensive. Payday Loans (also referred to as Payday Advances, Cash Advances, Deferred Deposit Transactions/Loans) and high-interest loans should be used for short-term financial needs only and not as a long-term financial solution. Customers with credit difficulties should seek credit counseling before entering into any loan transaction. See State Center for specific information and requirements.

Title loans are very risky. Because you use your vehicle as collateral, it can be taken by the lender if you don’t make your payment or come to an alternative arrangement. Often, that means rolling over your loan. The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau studied title loans and found that over 20 percent end in a car being repossessed. Only 12 percent of borrowers pay off the loan without having to renew. More than a third of borrowers end up taking out more than seven loans, meaning they have to pay nearly as much in fees as they borrowed in the first place.
A report from the Federal Reserve Bank of New York concluded that, "We ... test whether payday lending fits our definition of predatory. We find that in states with higher payday loan limits, less educated households and households with uncertain income are less likely to be denied credit, but are not more likely to miss a debt payment. Absent higher delinquency, the extra credit from payday lenders does not fit our definition of predatory."[24] The caveat to this is that with a term of under 30 days there are no payments, and the lender is more than willing to roll the loan over at the end of the period upon payment of another fee. The report goes on to note that payday loans are extremely expensive, and borrowers who take a payday loan are at a disadvantage in comparison to the lender, a reversal of the normal consumer lending information asymmetry, where the lender must underwrite the loan to assess creditworthiness.
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