According to the CFB, more than 80 percent of payday loans are rolled over. When you roll over a loan, you pay the finance charge and have another two weeks to pay back the initial amount. For example, if you take out $200 with a $40 charge, you’d normally pay $240 at the end of a two-week period. If you can’t pay it all back, you pay the $40 and rollover the $200 while also taking on another $40 finance charge. If you pay that loan back, you end up paying a total of $280.
According to a study by The Pew Charitable Trusts, "Most payday loan borrowers [in the United States] are white, female, and are 25 to 44 years old. However, after controlling for other characteristics, there are five groups that have higher odds of having used a payday loan: those without a four-year college degree; home renters; African Americans; those earning below $40,000 annually; and those who are separated or divorced." Most borrowers use payday loans to cover ordinary living expenses over the course of months, not unexpected emergencies over the course of weeks. The average borrower is indebted about five months of the year.[14]
In US law, a payday lender can use only the same industry standard collection practices used to collect other debts, specifically standards listed under the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act (FDCPA). The FDCPA prohibits debt collectors from using abusive, unfair, and deceptive practices to collect from debtors. Such practices include calling before 8 o'clock in the morning or after 9 o'clock at night, or calling debtors at work.[32]
Payday lenders generally do not report to the three main credit reporting bureaus — Equifax, Experian and TransUnion, so taking out one of these loans is unlikely to positively or negatively affect your credit score unless you have trouble with your repayments. Keeping that in mind, sometimes payday lenders send your repayment information to smaller credit reporting agencies, so that information can still be accessed by mainstream banks and lenders.
In Ohio, SCIL, Inc. dba Speedy Cash, is a registered Ohio Credit Services Organization (CS.900174.000) operating pursuant to the Ohio Credit Services Organization Act. The actual lender is an unaffiliated third party. The Ohio laws against discrimination require that all creditors make credit equally available to all credit worthy customers, and that credit reporting agencies maintain separate credit histories on each individual upon request. The Ohio civil rights commission administers compliance with this law.
Dallas, Texas - home of professional sports teams such as the Dallas Cowboys, Dallas Mavericks, and the Dallas Stars. The city is known for its amazing shopping opportunities, superb dining, and wide, open spaces. Nearby attractions include Six Flags over Texas, Hurricane Harbor, and the Dallas Zoo. However, the citizens of Dallas also have significant amounts of debt, with the average Texan owing $5,960 in credit card debt in 2015. It is easy to get into debt, but it seems almost impossible to get out of debt. In times of financial need, people in Dallas may resort to payday loans to solve their financial problems. However, these loans have a reputation for leading borrowers into a vicious cycle of debt. There is an alternative to payday loans that is a much better choice.
We’d like to add two more pieces of advice to those who are shopping around for a loan; 1) If a lender offers you more than you can afford to borrow, you can ask them to lower it. Take advantage of that opportunity as it will ease repayment, and 2) Avoid the temptation of paying to extend your loan duration (often called a “roll over”). Instead of paying a fee to postpone your repayment date, ask your lender for a payment plan.
Though regulated at the state and federal level, there are still payday lenders that attempt to skirt the rules. Some are online-only lenders based in other countries. Other lenders work around state laws by operating out of Native American reservations. Be wary of brokers that offer to connect you with lending partners – this can result in a lot of calls and emails about offers.
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