We stuck with direct lenders who comply with state laws. A good way to tell if a lender follows the rules is if its website asks what state you live in before giving you a quote. If a lender says all loans have the same fee no matter where you live, that’s a tipoff you may be dealing with a less-reputable lender you should avoid. We didn’t include any of those lenders on our lineup.
If you are late on a payment, you usually have to pay a late fee. Lenders may allow a grace period of 10 or 15 days before they charge a late fee. Typical late fees range from $15 to $30, with some lenders charging 5 percent of your monthly loan amount or $15, whichever is greater. Some personal loan lenders do not have late fees. The fees for a returned payment and/or to process a check can be up to $15.
Read all of your loan agreement. And make sure to ask questions too. Don’t just look at the interest rate for your loan, also look at the APR—this will include any additional fees that you’re being charged and will give you a better idea of how much the loan actually costs in comparison to other loans. If the lender cannot answer the questions that you’re asking them, then they are NOT a lender you should be working with!
MoneyLend.net does the hard work of researching lenders for consumers to provide them with the most accurate information they need to compare interest rates, types of lenders, fees and more. MoneyLend is able to match consumers to the best lender for them in all 50 states. Their lenders offer short-term and installment loans, and many have low APRs. They have information for those needing personal or business loans.
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A 2012 report produced by the Cato Institute found that the cost of the loans is overstated, and that payday lenders offer a product traditional lenders simply refuse to offer. However, the report is based on 40 survey responses collected at a payday storefront location.[43] The report's author, Victor Stango, was on the board of the Consumer Credit Research Foundation (CCRF) until 2015, an organization funded by payday lenders, and received $18,000 in payments from CCRF in 2013.[44]
The process to obtain a payday loan is very easy, and it all starts with filling out our online request form on the left side of this page. Within minutes of submitting it, a representative from your nearest store location will call you back to confirm your information, answer your questions and make sure you have the simple required items for your payday loan.
Short term loans are usually for smaller amount of loans. If you would be borrowing $100,000, you may compare your personal loan options through this page. Please review the criteria, details of the loan product you’ve chosen and contact the lender directly to discuss your eligibility. Once you’ve chosen a loan and you think you are eligible, you may click on the ‘Go to site’ button to be redirected to the lender’s main website and apply from there.
Credit.com’s journalism is largely supported by an e-commerce business model. Rather than rely on revenue from display ad impressions, Credit.com maintains a financial marketplace separate from its editorial pages. When someone navigates to those pages, and applies for a credit card, for example, Credit.com will get paid what is essentially a finder’s fee if that person ends up getting the card. That doesn’t mean, however, that our editorial decisions are informed by the products available in our marketplace. The editorial team chooses what to write about and how to write about it independently of the decisions and priorities of the business side of the company. In fact, we maintain a strict and important firewall between the editorial and business departments. Our mission as journalists is to serve the reader, not the advertiser. In that sense, we are no different from any other news organization that is supported by ad revenue.
According to a study by The Pew Charitable Trusts, "Most payday loan borrowers [in the United States] are white, female, and are 25 to 44 years old. However, after controlling for other characteristics, there are five groups that have higher odds of having used a payday loan: those without a four-year college degree; home renters; African Americans; those earning below $40,000 annually; and those who are separated or divorced." Most borrowers use payday loans to cover ordinary living expenses over the course of months, not unexpected emergencies over the course of weeks. The average borrower is indebted about five months of the year.[14]
We stuck with direct lenders who comply with state laws. A good way to tell if a lender follows the rules is if its website asks what state you live in before giving you a quote. If a lender says all loans have the same fee no matter where you live, that’s a tipoff you may be dealing with a less-reputable lender you should avoid. We didn’t include any of those lenders on our lineup.

Unlike most loans, which require a minimum credit score for acceptance, payday loans don’t have any credit requirements. To apply, you need to present proof of income and a checking account, but the lender doesn’t look at your FICO score. Likewise, records of timely payments don’t appear on your credit report. So, a payday loan can’t help you build credit, and applying for one doesn’t impact it, either.
With a title loan, the amount you qualify for depends on an assessment of your car’s value. Loans range from a few hundred dollars to $10,000. A standard title loan is due in full after 30 days. This includes the finance charge, which can be as much as $125 for a $500 loan – that means you’ll pay $625 total when the loan is due. According to the Pew Charitable Trust, the average APR on title loans is around 300%.
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