Many countries offer basic banking services through their postal systems. The United States Post Office Department offered such as service in the past. Called the United States Postal Savings System it was discontinued in 1967. In January 2014 the Office of the Inspector General of the United States Postal Service issued a white paper suggesting that the USPS could offer banking services, to include small dollar loans for under 30% APR.[93] Support and criticism quickly followed; opponents of postal banking argued that as payday lenders would be forced out of business due to competition, the plan is nothing more than a scheme to support postal employees.[94][95]
Credit.com’s journalism is largely supported by an e-commerce business model. Rather than rely on revenue from display ad impressions, Credit.com maintains a financial marketplace separate from its editorial pages. When someone navigates to those pages, and applies for a credit card, for example, Credit.com will get paid what is essentially a finder’s fee if that person ends up getting the card. That doesn’t mean, however, that our editorial decisions are informed by the products available in our marketplace. The editorial team chooses what to write about and how to write about it independently of the decisions and priorities of the business side of the company. In fact, we maintain a strict and important firewall between the editorial and business departments. Our mission as journalists is to serve the reader, not the advertiser. In that sense, we are no different from any other news organization that is supported by ad revenue.
Line of Credit: Available at Allied Cash Advance locations in Virginia only. Approval depends upon meeting legal, regulatory and underwriting requirements. Allied Cash Advance may, at their discretion, verify application information by using national databases that may provide information from one or more national credit bureaus, and Allied Cash Advance or third party lenders may take that into consideration in the approval process. Credit limits range from $250 to $1500. After your line of credit is set up, you have the option to draw any amount greater than $100, in increments of $0 up to the credit limit, as long as: you make your scheduled payments; and your outstanding balance does not exceed your approved credit limit. Minimum payments equal 10% of the principal portion of the outstanding balance, plus a Monthly Maintenance Fee. As long as you continue to make on-time and complete payments, you will remain in good standing and be able to continue using your line of credit account.
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Negotiate a settlement. If restructuring the payback terms isn’t an option, the credit counseling agency will try to work with the lender to determine a settlement amount that will resolve the debt altogether. If you can pay off the loan with a lump-sum payment (this is the time to ask Mom or Dad for help), the agency may be able to settle the debt for a percentage of the outstanding amount.
Though you may not have a lot of extra time, a side gig could too be an option. Ideas include driving with a ride-share service like Uber, walking dogs, participating in research studies or even taking online surveys to earn more cash. If you find yourself regularly needing small amounts of money to last you through the week, consider exploring ongoing freelance opportunities in your area of expertise — Upwork and Fiverr are a few places to start.
The Credit.com editorial team is staffed by a team of editors and reporters, each with many years of financial reporting experience. We’ve worked for places like the New York Times, American Banker, Frontline, TheStreet.com, Business Insider, ABC News, NBC News, CNBC and many others. We also employ a few freelancers and more than 50 contributors (these are typically subject matter experts from the worlds of finance, academia, politics, business and elsewhere).
Adam West is the Managing Editor for BadCredit.org, where he regularly coordinates with financial experts and industry movers and shakers to report the latest information, news, and advice on topics related to helping subprime borrowers achieve greater financial literacy and improved credit scores. Adam has more than a dozen years of editing, writing, and graphic design experience for award-winning print and online publications, and specializes in the areas of credit scores, subprime financial products and services, and financial education.
Bad credit loans typically have higher interest rates and shorter loan terms than loans offered to people with good credit. Standard bad credit loan terms are two to five years with an average annual percentage rate of 25 percent, according to Bankrate. In comparison, personal loans for those with good credit typically have term lengths from one to seven years and an average APR of 4.29 percent.
In a perfect world, you could rely on a credit card to cover emergency expenses. But, as you might have already guessed, most Americans don’t have that kind of available credit on hand to use either. In fact, according to a Harvard University study, nearly 40 percent of households making less than $40,000 a year have no credit cards at all.2 And one in ten Americans have no credit score whatsoever!3
In the UK Sarah-Jayne Clifton of the Jubilee Debt Campaign said, “austerity, low wages, and insecure work are driving people to take on high cost debt from rip-off lenders just to put food on the table. We need the government to take urgent action, not only to rein in rip-off lenders, but also to tackle the cost of living crisis and cuts to social protection that are driving people towards the loan sharks in the first place.”[21]

States have varying regulations in place to protect consumers when it comes to short-term loans. Payday loans are illegal in some state, while other states regulate or restrict them. Lenders, online or otherwise, must comply with these regulations when they consider you for a loan, so the state you live in will play a part in whether you are eligible.
Interest-only payment title loans: These loans work similarly to traditional title loans, but their repayment strategy is different. With interest-only payments, borrowers first pay off the amount of interest on the loan. They are then required to pay off the amount of the loan in full. Interest-only title loans usually last for a longer period of time than traditional title loans. Be careful with this type of loan, as you may end up paying more than you actually borrowed and still not pay off the loan.
If you already have existing credit card debt and you’re in need of emergency funds, but you have average to good credit, consider the Discover it® Balance Transfer card. The card offers an extended, 18-month window for you to transfer and pay off existing debt. And cardholders even enjoy 0% intro APR period for their first six months on purchases. (After both introductory periods end, ongoing APR is 13.99% – 24.99% variable.)
Making regular payments is a must, and consumers must refrain from using credit cards while in the program. The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) urges consumers to carefully review DMP terms and ensure creditors are willing to work within its confines before jumping in. Keep in mind this isn’t a quick fix. Paying off debt through a DMP can take years depending on how much debt you have.
Credit.com’s journalism is largely supported by an e-commerce business model. Rather than rely on revenue from display ad impressions, Credit.com maintains a financial marketplace separate from its editorial pages. When someone navigates to those pages, and applies for a credit card, for example, Credit.com will get paid what is essentially a finder’s fee if that person ends up getting the card. That doesn’t mean, however, that our editorial decisions are informed by the products available in our marketplace. The editorial team chooses what to write about and how to write about it independently of the decisions and priorities of the business side of the company. In fact, we maintain a strict and important firewall between the editorial and business departments. Our mission as journalists is to serve the reader, not the advertiser. In that sense, we are no different from any other news organization that is supported by ad revenue.

With a title loan, the amount you qualify for depends on an assessment of your car’s value. Loans range from a few hundred dollars to $10,000. A standard title loan is due in full after 30 days. This includes the finance charge, which can be as much as $125 for a $500 loan – that means you’ll pay $625 total when the loan is due. According to the Pew Charitable Trust, the average APR on title loans is around 300%.
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