Title loans are very risky. Because you use your vehicle as collateral, it can be taken by the lender if you don’t make your payment or come to an alternative arrangement. Often, that means rolling over your loan. The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau studied title loans and found that over 20 percent end in a car being repossessed. Only 12 percent of borrowers pay off the loan without having to renew. More than a third of borrowers end up taking out more than seven loans, meaning they have to pay nearly as much in fees as they borrowed in the first place.

^ $15 on $100 over 14 days is ratio of 15/100 = 0.15, so this is a 14-day rate. Over a year (365.25 days) this 14-day rate can aggregate to either 391% (assuming you carry the $100 loan for a year, and pay $15 every 14 days: 0.15 x (365.25/14) = 3.91, which converts to a percentage increase (interest rate) of: 3.91 x 100 = 391%) or 3733% (assuming you take out a new loan every 14 days that will cover your principal and "charge", and every new loan is taken at same 15% "charge" of the amount borrowed: (1 + 0.15)365.25/14 − 1 = 37.33, which converts to a percentage increase (interest rate) of: 37.33 x 100 = 3733%).
In Ohio, SCIL, Inc. dba Speedy Cash, is a registered Ohio Credit Services Organization (CS.900174.000) operating pursuant to the Ohio Credit Services Organization Act. The actual lender is an unaffiliated third party. The Ohio laws against discrimination require that all creditors make credit equally available to all credit worthy customers, and that credit reporting agencies maintain separate credit histories on each individual upon request. The Ohio civil rights commission administers compliance with this law. 

NOTICE: The Federal Equal Credit Opportunity Act prohibits creditors from discriminating against credit applicants on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, sex, marital status, age (provided the applicant has the capacity to enter into a binding contract); because all or part of the applicant's income derives from any public assistance program; or because the applicant has in good faith exercised any right under the Consumer Credit Protection Act. The Federal agency that administers compliance with this law concerning this creditor is the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, 1700 G Street NW, Washington DC 20006 and the Federal Trade Commission, Equal Credit Opportunity, Washington DC 20580.
There are many terms for this kind of credit — payday loans, cash advance loans, check advance loans, deferred deposit loans or post-dated check loans — which you can get from a variety of sources. Whether you walk into a payday lender’s store or apply online, the process is basically the same: You provide some personal and financial information, request a loan for a certain dollar amount (secured by check or bank account debit authorization), pay a fee for the loan and receive the cash or deposit into your bank account.
Compare offers from multiple lenders. Even if you have to get the money in a hurry, take some extra time and see which lender in your area or online is the most reliable and/or can offer you the best deal. Finding the loan that works best for you is important. You might even want to compare some lenders now before you’re hit with an emergency expense. That way, you can act quickly when you need to while staying confident that you’re getting the best deal available.
With a title loan, the amount you qualify for depends on an assessment of your car’s value. Loans range from a few hundred dollars to $10,000. A standard title loan is due in full after 30 days. This includes the finance charge, which can be as much as $125 for a $500 loan – that means you’ll pay $625 total when the loan is due. According to the Pew Charitable Trust, the average APR on title loans is around 300%.
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